Monday, March 7, 2011

Book Release Celebration!
Introducing Chapter 6: Shelter & Karen

Today marks the half way point in our  Book Release Celebration series of posts. Remember, EVERYONE who joins the discussion by leaving a comment in answer to today's question will go into a draw to win a copy of our book Twelve by Twelve: The International Art Quilt Challenge. The book drawing is closed.  Stay tuned for the winner details.
Twelve by Twelve Theme Series by Karen Rips
Hi everyone, this is Karen, and I'd like to talk to you about my chapter in our book Twelve by Twelve: The International Art Quilt Challenge.  When Terri gave us the theme Shelter my mind went everywhere from park benches to home and hearth.  After trying out a few sketches that were totally unmotivating to me, I came at the issue from a different view point and using my travel photos as inspiration, I went on to depict Machu Picchu using painted interfacing and thermofax screens.  If you'd like to learn more, Gerrie and I both talk about the thermofax process in the book.
Lost City by Karen Rips
I started out quilting about 30 years ago with traditional quilts, and didn't really make my first art quilt until 2005.  I haven't looked back, and rarely make traditional quilts anymore.  I'm wondering how many of our readers are art quilters, and did you follow the path I did, with traditional quilting first, or jump right into art quilting?

33 comments:

nicolette said...

I’m not an art quilter. I only quilt for about 4 years and took some art quilt classes in the beginning. I discovered I first wanted to learn about traditional quilting techniques.
As I’m a graphic designer I would love to translate my skills into fabric.

Linda Robertus said...

Yes, I started making baby quilts in 2006, when I was expectng my 3rd son, and after 2 years moved on to contemporary (dare I call it art) quilts.

lag123 said...

I am not an art quilter, but absolutely love them and am in awe.

lag110 at mchsi dot com

Vicki said...

I have become an art quilter/fibre artist from quilting. It was just a natural progression for me and had to happen, besides I just can't help playing with every new technique that comes up.

Gina said...

I was first attracted to quilting by crazy quilts. I did a little of traditional and crazy quilting back in the 70's and 80's. Only recently have I returned to quilting but now it's art quilts. As for fiber art in general I loved dyeing, spinning and weaving wall pieces.

tesuque said...

I dream art quilts, but continue to make traditional ones.

Colleen Kole said...

Yes, I made traditional quilts for years and still enjoy them. But about four years ago, I started on this path and really can't look back.

Melissa said...

I'm following your path, but I'm still on the traditional side.

I LOVE your quilt

Janet said...

I am a traditional quilter who is finding herself breaking away from tradition.

Lisa Flowers Ross said...

I am an artist and was before I was introduced to quilting. My friend asked me to take a quilting class with her. I made a few traditional quilts and then found The Art Quilt book and decided to try my art in fabric. And that's what I do now.

Ruth said...

I made my first quilt in the early 1980s using the English hand paper peicing method. It was a double bed sized quilt. And I said never again - until a colleague at work told me about machine piecing and rotary cutters in 2004! It seemed so much more feasible to work that way that I enrolled in some classes and made a couple of small lap quilts. Then I discovered Quilt Univesity and took lots of courses there. I've never made another bed quilt and now make quilts intended as wall hangings. I believe I can call myself an art quilter now.

Connie Rose said...

I came to art quilting via surface design, which I got to from weaving. It was weaving-woven shibori-surface design-art quilting. I sold my loom early this year and everything related. Never did traditional quilting at all, and my focus with art quilting is on the fabric that I create.

Createology said...

For me it is not about quilting and how to do it because I don't quilt. Instead quilting by others is all about the inspiration and the stories of how they came to do such a piece of work that I enjoy. I honestly believe the art quilts entrance me! Thank you for sharing in this wonderful new book I hope to win.

gill said...

I started quilting about 10 years ago and I'm just starting to move towards art quilts!

JB said...

I started with traditional quilting also and my art quilts may use mixed media surface techniques but usually end up forming a grid of some sort.

CarolynPhi said...

I began traditional quilting literally sitting on my Grandmother's knee while she worked the sewing machine pedals and I fed the fabric under the presser foot.

In 2007 I joined an online quilting group; looking back, it was more for the conversation than for the quiltmaking, I'm afraid...

Within the group was a small nest of rogue crazy quilters; after being seduced by the sheer joy of working with "no rules," and, of course, using lots of sparkly bling, I haven't looked back.

I am now working on my fifth art quilt, and am totally hooked! I won't leave crazy quilting behind, and there's always the opportunity to add sparkly pretties to my art quilts!

Carolyn in SoCal

Bev said...

Have loved fabric since I was a child. Avoided learning to quilt for years because I knew once I started it would take over my life. And it has!!! Began as a traditional quilter but the door has opened and I have walked through. Beginning my adventure into "art" quilts and have stopped walking and started to run. Love it!!

Jeannie said...

I started traditional quilting in 1976. Took classes from some of the best at the NW Quilt Conference (now defunct). There I saw an exhibition of art quilts by Michael James, Katie PM, Carol Fallert, etc. I was hooked. Then I found the Art Quilt List and surface design. I haven't looked back! I still have my stash and will make a TV/Bed quilt, but it isn't the Jinny Beyer inspired quilt of yesteryear. Cheers.

Renate said...

I started quilting in 1997 after the purchase of a book, "Quilts, Quilts, Quilts." Since that first dorky homemade looking quilt, my skills have improved to the point where I have spent considerable time amassing books, ideas and stories about, for and from "art quilters". I don't know, isn't anyone that creates a quilt an artist?

oregonjudy said...

For me, starting with traditional quilting was an easy way to transition to art quilting. Some minds just need to take that path.

Lindi said...

I am still doing traditional quilting but have started to dabble in art quilting when I get the chance. So far, I have only had time to do postcards and A4 journal quilts.
I long for the time when I get focus more on the art. :)

Cindy Ericsson said...

I started with small (8x10 and under) journal quilts about 2 years ago. I have a huge emotional attachment to bed quilts, so I'm learning to quilt large pieces on my home machine.

Dotti said...

I started traditional quilting in the late 70's and migrated slowly into art quilts in the early 2000's for a change.

Barbara Strobel Lardon said...

I started by making a baby quilt for my daughter who is not 27 years old.
Although there were art quilters then, most of the attention was given to the traditional quilters like Georgia Bonesteel. Now I only do art quilts which I found released me from all the rules and restrictions of traditional quilting as well fed my desire to design my own pieces.

Exuberant Color said...

I started out 53 years ago making traditional quilts. The art quilts didn't happen until the 1980's. Now I make both.

magsramsay said...

Yes I make art quilts, almost from the start. I've painted and drawn since I was a child and been quilting for over 30 years.My mother taught embroidery and quilting and I absorbed the books, magazines ( and used her stash )

In the UK, it seems many contempororary and art quilters come into it from an embroidery background as much as traditional quilting.

SuSaw said...

I'm perched on the edge of the precipice of art quilting. I just finished my sixth fairly traditional quilt for a great niece and have a photo, fabric cut and some pieces placed for my FIRST art quilt.

I'm excited to begin.

Anonymous said...

I guess you could say I'm a wanna be art quilter. I thought I wanted to make landscape quilts but find myself making more traditional quilts but with a twist. Most of my work has been around 40 inches square, though I'd like to try some smaller works and play more with new techniques. I am so inspired by the work of all you 12s.
Rosemary
bike hike quilt at g mail dot com

wlstarn said...

I started out interested in traditional quilts, but am an artist. I made a sort of traditional king size quilt about 16 years ago & I still haven't figured out how to finish quilting it! In the mean time, it's all about art!

emprint said...

I collected books on quilting, both traditional and art,for years and then finally took the plunge to do traditional piecing. After a two week workshop with Nancy Crow, my life was changed for ever and I've done art quilts ever since. Would that I had started right in with art quilts. I get too tight and am forever having to remind myself to loosen up! Your book has been a real inspiration. Thank you, thank you.

Anonymous said...

Def traditional trying to head to art quilting but I think all quilts are pieces of art, think Gees bend

marsha in va Beach

linda said...

I've never made a traditional quilt but I've always sewed and loved fabric and design. My interest is in surface design - have only been getting into art quilts fairly recently. Although some of the techniques I've used in my textiles are related to quilting.

Helen from Hobart said...

I have a pathological inability to follow a pattern exactly. I always need to change something - the colour, the texture, the shape, the size. I can't stop myself, it just happens - even when I am determined to follow the pattern exactly, some little thing just niggles until I change it.
My first quilt - in a class - had appliqued angels and I just could NOT give them red patterend dresses, I had to find leftovers from my wedding dress and add some gathers for the skirts. So it was 3 dimensional before I had learned how to use fusable web on a flat surface !!!
Yep it does lead me into tricky situations - but I can't stop myself.