Monday, March 1, 2010

Blue Meditation on Balance


This did not come together easily. I am pleased with the results, mostly. But the journey was bumpy. I am not sure if that mood is reflected in the quilt, or even if I want it to be. And yet, I'm spilling my feelings here.

I didn't finish this until yesterday evening. Too late to take a picture with any good light. And it's raining this morning, so still no good light. Maybe that's the metaphor here, "no good light."

My life is full of repetition; some of it is comfortable and meditative, and some is monotonous and maddening. Lots of hand stitching reflects this reality. I am continually seeking balance in my life. As I worked on the basic design for this quilt, I kept trying to add just a bit of dynamic asymmetry, but I just couldn't do it. If the only thing I can really control is the composition of this quilt, then I'm going to make it balanced.


That blue, branchy piece came from the "free" bin at On Board Fabrics in Edgecomb, Maine. My art quilt friends and I shopped there when I visited in October. Kathy and I both grabbed several of these pieces in red, green and blue and challenged each other to use them. (Here is her version, in progress. She used the backside of the green piece.) Recently, I was desperately trying to fit the fabric into another much larger quilt I am working on. It really wasn't working and I finally had to give in and let it go. (You're reading into these larger life metaphors, right?) I'm happy to have salvaged it for this piece.

I completed two other pieces for this "colorplay" challenge. I'll post them on my blog. It was difficult picking one for the official 12x12 reveal. This one has the nicest details, I think. As much as I try to simplify and let the work sit comfortably in spareness, I enjoy digging in. I like finding ways to add interest in the openness.

10 comments:

Gerrie said...

I think it is the limited color palette that really challenges us. You cannot fudge with a splash of color and so the design elements become very important. I think that is the problem that I had. Value becomes very important in the piece and you have that going on. I must say that I did not guess this was yours when it popped up!! I think your title is terrific. Your stitches always make me happy.

Kristin L said...

I too love the title, but I knew this was yours right away. :-) You are the queen of the balanced, symmetrical, shrine composition! Why not create the balance you crave in the one thing you CAN control -- your art? Blue, being a meditative color, is the perfect opportunity to create just this.

Dale Anne said...

LOVE the title and like Kristin, I knew this one was yours before scrolling down to see who posted it.
GREAT JOB!

now....popping over to your blog to see the others.

Diane said...

Even without reading your description, this piece says something about balance being precarious. I think, compositionally, it might be the branch piece on top -- just assymetrical enough to cause a bit of tension -- and the angled bit of sequin waste at the bottom. I think those are what strike me as making the balance seem, well, a touch "on edge." And that's what I like about it -- it has your stylistic elements, fabulous stitching... and yet there is tension here too. It was interesting to feel that in the piece and then read the description.

Deborah Boschert said...

Diane... how interesting that you noted the "edge" feeling of the piece. One of the other pieces I created is called Blue Meditation on Edges. It's on my blog.

Terry said...

Deborah, I think this works quite beautifully, but I understand your difficulties. The branchy piece is really quite naturalistic, which is a bit of a contrast to your usual style. I think of your spiky little trees and would have recognized a branch done in a similar way instantly. I also think you could flip this piece 90 degrees, so the branch is on the left and have a wonderful assymetrical composition. Maybe there is a thought there--that symmetry exists depending on how you look at things.

Karen said...

Deborah, I looked at your other pieces and I think you have a wonderful series going on here, they are all edgy and make me want to really study them.

Terri Stegmiller said...

As with all of your work Deborah, I like this piece. You have a way of taking fabrics, both plain and fancy, combining them in mostly simple shapes and placing them in a manner that gives it interest. And the added embellished touches are the icing on the cake for me.

Nikki said...

I love the tenstion the branch peice adds on the top. Like so much of life, we can keep things in balance for a while, but it is so easy to add that one last thing that tries desperately to topple us. I love how the curved stitching it trying to keep it under control. And the little bit of sequin waste at the bottom is feelig the strain.

I enjoy seeing the other two pieces and how each has a little more added to it. If only we could be satisfied with a simple, calm composition in life. I know I can't resist the tendancy to add just a little more. I love this whole series and all that it speaks to.

Nikki said...

I love the tenstion the branch peice adds on the top. Like so much of life, we can keep things in balance for a while, but it is so easy to add that one last thing that tries desperately to topple us. I love how the curved stitching it trying to keep it under control. And the little bit of sequin waste at the bottom is feelig the strain.

I enjoy seeing the other two pieces and how each has a little more added to it. If only we could be satisfied with a simple, calm composition in life. I know I can't resist the tendancy to add just a little more. I love this whole series and all that it speaks to.