Monday, October 1, 2012

The Original Maverick

Does this guy look like a maverick? He is the original Maverick!

I had such a hard time wrapping my head around the Maverick theme! Even after a great discussion with Karen and Ted Rips and my husband Ray, where we talked about what makes a person a maverick and who are and are not mavericks, I was still at a loss. Always good to do a little research at that point.

I discovered that the origin of the word was this man—Samuel Maverick, a Texas cattleman in the mid 1800's. Mr. Maverick refused to brand his cattle. The shrewdness of his decision became evident at round-up time, when he declared that all unbranded cattle belonged to him! As a result of the ensuing uproar, ever after, unbranded cattle were referred to as mavericks. The meaning evolved to include people who refuse to be branded with stereotypes and live their lives on their own terms.

When I found several old photos of Samuel Maverick online I decided I wanted to try to create the look of an old sepia-toned photo using black, tan and white fabrics. I was especially intrigued by the idea of using prints for this. I think you get the idea if you stand back and squint your eyes!


12 comments:

Karen said...

Wow Terry, you took it right to the source! This portrait turned out really nice, and it's an interesting story too.

Gerrie said...

I agree with Karen. I really admire Terry's ability to make something like this. I am, as usual, in awe.

Diane Perin Hock said...

Oh! Terry! What a wonderful portrait! As always, your use of printed fabrics is flawless. The sepia tones work so well. And somehow you have captured a steely, defiant look in his eyes that makes you know this man is going to do JUST what he wants to do. You've done the hardest thing, I think, and that's conveyed a very strong sense of personality.

(By the way, thinking about the origin of the word maverick, I thought to illustrate it by having my piece show a bunch of cattle rumps. Your direct approach to the origin is much nicer!!)

Françoise said...

At last, I get to meet that famous Mr Maverick. He's rather handsome. And I agree with Diane, his eyes have exactly the right expression.

Kristin L said...

You nailed the historic sepia tone look! It's a wonderful portrait. I think you were very clever in the way you took the word right to the source.

Terri Stegmiller said...

This is a great portrait. I wonder what Mr. Maverick would think of our challenge if he was still here today.

kirsty said...

You are so very skilled, Terry! I'm very glad that we have the Original Maverick in our collection :)
(and, Francoise, I agree - he's rather handsome!)

Deborah Boschert said...

I didn't know this origin at all. So interesting. I really like seeing him in cloth. You did a great job. I'm sure it was a careful, detailed process and it was certainly worth it! The color palette really suggests the right era which is so important to understanding who he was and why you chose him.

Robin said...

What a fabulous use of prints to create the portrait! Most times these look ok close but much better far away. Somehow you managed to make it look good even close up.

Helen Conway said...

He looks kinda disapproving of Gerrie's red hair! No seriously its well done and appropriate to have him around.

Nikki said...

Your ability to do pictorial quilts is amazing. You do perfectly what I would never even attempt. Even without knowing the story I can just feel that he is a maverick.

Brenda Gael Smith said...

This is an accomplished portrait. The sepia tones and garb perfectly evoke the era of the Wild West. I'm glad that at least one piece references a person and who better than the original Mr Maverick!